An Open Letter to the Next President of the United States Regarding Healthcare for the Poor

Dear Mr. Trump and Sec. Clinton;

I realize that with only a few more weeks before America decides which of you will be our next leader, you are both busy talking about the things that you believe will get you elected. But for a moment, I want to tell you about some people who are often forgotten: the working uninsured. I doubt you’ll mention them in your campaign appearances or even on your social media – and I understand that – but I still have to make their case.

I will always make their case.

I have worked in Memphis, TN for 30 years as a family physician at Church Health. At our clinic, we provide healthcare for people working in low-wage jobs who do not have health insurance. We’ve cared for over 70,000 people through the years without relying on government funding. I have no desire to make the work we do political, but with all humility and kindness, I ask for whichever of you becomes our country’s next president to please consider the following points when it comes to the healthcare needs of the poor in America.

  1. We have a serious problem with issues of mental health and substance abuse. A person with a serious mental health issue will live a much shorter life than the rest of us. These issues cannot just be willed away. Behavioral heath issues disproportionately affect the poor.
  2. The number one predictor of health outcomes is education. A poor education leads to an unhealthy life.
  3. Listen to the people you are trying to help. The answers are unlikely to come just from smart people in Washington or large institutions.
  4. Do not claim the problem is solved by whatever new policy you institute. You can help with policy, but it takes all of us to change our health outcomes.
  5. Everyone in healthcare is not out to get rich. Do not be cynical about those of us who work to care for others because we feel called by God or are driven by matters of social justice. I know there is tremendous fraud in the system, but there is also tremendous good.
  6. Effective treatments must be affordable for all. That requires lowering costs and finding a means of access for all. It does not mean the government must do it all. In Memphis, we have over 1,000 physicians who volunteer their time for the uninsured and undocumented. Almost every physician I know will state that they went to medical school because they wanted to help people. If you show them a way to care for people who have no other options, physicians will do the right thing. If you assume physicians only care about the money, then they will back away. Everyone needs a pat on the back to thank them for when they are kind.
  7. We all need help to better deal with the issues around the end of life. Rich and poor are tortured because we cannot accept that death is a part of life. We waste billions of dollars and cause endless heart break by offering unacceptable hope for the future when accepting that the end of this life has come is the right thing to do. Call on our faith communities to address this issue and we will all become healthier.
  8. Health and healthcare are not simply commodities; they are necessary elements for all other aspects of our country to thrive. For all Americans – rich, poor, and every color – to thrive, our health outcomes must improve. If we are to be judged as a great country, people building our houses must be cared for when they fall off the roof no matter what their immigration status is.

In my thirty years of caring for the people who work to make our communities great, I’ve been amazed at the resiliency of people who have so little. The joy they are able to maintain even when they have little money and work harder physically than I ever dreamed of doing inspires me every day. It makes me proud to be an American.

Surely, in the years to come, we can work hard together to assure them that we as a country will give them the benefits of the best health care system in the world. Indeed, doing so is truly part of what makes America great.

With hope for healing,

Scott

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